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Things to Know About Bungalow Style Houses

Updated: Dec 2, 2020


Bungalow Style


A bungalow style house is a single storey house, normally square in form and generally 1,000 – 2,000 square feet. A bungalow has a large, pitched roof and can have rooms built into it, providing an additional "half" floor to the home. Usually, they also feature the living room as the wide, central space with all the other adjacent spaces.


Due to its size and layout, this style of home can be a common choice for young families, people looking to downsize, and those with mobility or physical disabilities.


Bungalow homes made the American dream of homeownership possible for many working-class families when they were first constructed.


History of Bungalow Style Houses


Although the bungalow gained in popularity in the United States in the early 1900s, in the early 1600s it originated from India, specifically the area of Bengal. The name is originally derived from the word "Bangla" in Hindi, meaning "of or belonging to Bengal."


Early European architects drew inspiration from Bengali farmers' thatched huts during that period, modifying the design into a quick-build structure that provided shade and refuge from the hot sun and sweltering climate of the region.


As Europeans returned from India, they brought with them their love of the bungalow style. The first bungalow style house was built in the UK in 1869.


The design came to the United States in the 1890s. Although initially designed in California for more vacation-style retreats, during what is known as the Arts and Crafts movement, which promoted hand-crafting with natural materials.


Medium-Sized Bungalow

photo credit by antiquehomestyle


Factors To Consider When Considering A Bungalow

Before building a bungalow style home, you should consider both the benefits and drawbacks that come with bungalows. Here are a few of them to get you started.


Charm For Days

They may seem simplistic in nature, but bungalows are notable for their use of built-in storage, wainscoting, exposed ceiling beams, and other architectural features that appeal to those who love good design. With a focus on building with durable, quality materials during the Arts and Crafts movement, these homes are also built to last.


One-Floor Living

Having common spaces and bedrooms all on one floor can be helpful for people with mobility difficulties. However, if you want to spread out, party, or have kids; having them all on one floor can be an annoyance. Many of the original bungalows may not have an open floor plan, so hosting activities at home can be challenging, as visitors may feel isolated, and gathering together may feel disjointed.


California-style Craftsman Bungalow

photo credit by antiquehomestyle


Security And Privacy

Some property owners may not feel as safe to have their bedroom windows on the ground level. On the other hand, for natural cover and more privacy, this feature will allow you to put in bushes and other plants.

You may want more protection for people you live with, along with having privacy from the outside world. Since bungalows with every room on one floor are relatively small, it can feel like you're stacked with little to no space on top of each other.


Ability To Add To The Home

As opposed to most multi story houses, the structure of a bungalow makes it easier to extend and/or remodel. Sometimes used as attic storage, the half-story space under the roof can be converted to a bonus room, bedroom, playroom or studio space.


Dark Interiors

Since bungalows are built to keep the heat out it is possible to reduce the amount of interior sunlight. With both artificial and natural light, there are several ways to brighten up your house. You may introduce recessed lighting, put in more lamps or add skylights, for instance.


If you’re interested in knowing more about bungalow-style houses, get in touch with an Architecture Firm in Fairfield, CT



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